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Bleeding After Menpause

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Most women experience menopause between the ages of 45 and 55. However, some women experience menopause earlier, some later. Either way, this is a natural process, and the reason for this change of status is usually hormonal.

But it may also be linked to a health condition. For example, the Menstrual Bleeding Connection reports that women with heavy menstrual bleeding are more likely to suffer from depression.

In midlife, menopause or not, the change of life leads to various conditions, including heavy menstrual bleeding or sometimes even abnormal vaginal bleeding. Bleeding, however, is not the most apparent symptom.

WHO IS AT A GREATER RISK OF EXPERIENCING POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING?

Perimenopausal women are more likely than others to have vaginal bleeding. It is common for menopause to begin at about ages 40 to 50; however, it may occur at any moment. It’s the time of life when a woman’s hormone levels start to fluctuate, and her periods become irregular.

Also, if you have had heavy menstrual bleeding, you are more likely to have it again. And you can get it after menopause as well. Finally, you are more likely to have it if you have a uterus, ovaries, cervix, vagina, or vulva.

HOW LIKELY IS PERIMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING?

There are two stages of menopause: perimenopause and menopause. Your hormones change throughout this period. As a result, you may be experiencing a heavier or lighter cycle than usual. Spotting may also be a possibility. To be expected.

Consult your physician if your bleeding is excessive or persists for an extended period. If you bleed profusely after a sexual encounter, get medical attention.

CAUSES

Most women notice bleeding between their periods as an inconvenience and an occasional surprise. In addition, they might complain of tiredness, irritability, weight gain, etc. This is because these are signs that your body is undergoing a transition, and the process is known as menopause.

In the first five years of this stage, the chances of menopausal bleeding are low, and only about 5% of the population experiences menopause-related problems. These may include spotting or irregular bleeding.

In some cases, there are no symptoms at all. As the years go by, the number of bleeding increases, leading to conditions like heavy menstrual bleeding, abnormal vaginal bleeding, and endometrial cancer.

Undeniably, it is essential to understand the causes of menopausal bleeding.

ENDOMETRIAL ATROPHY

This is the thinning of the lining of the uterus. It occurs naturally in women who have not been pregnant for a long time. As a result, the endometrium becomes thinner, which leads to bleeding.

It is important to note that each woman’s endometrium thickness is different. As a result, some women experience atrophy younger than others.

CERVICAL CANCER

There is a link between cervical cancer and heavy menstrual bleeding. The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, where the eggs are released during ovulation. If there is an infection in the cervix, it may lead to the development of cervical cancer.

Some STDs can cause severe health problems. For example, HPV can lead to cervical cancer.

OBESITY

Obesity is a condition where excess fat accumulates in the body. It can affect the body differently, but one of the most common is increased risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and certain types of cancer.

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism found that obese women were more likely to have heavy menstrual bleeding than women who were not overweight.

Excess body fat can cause hormone imbalances, leading to heavy menstrual bleeding. The researchers concluded that “obesity is associated with increased risk of heavy menstrual bleeding in women.”

HOW CAN WE DIAGNOSE POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING?

Physical examination and medical history review are the first steps in determining the source of your bleeding. In addition, you may need to take one or more of the following tests:

SONOHYSTEROGRAPHY

This test uses ultrasound to image the uterus and ovaries. A radiologist will insert a small needle into your vagina and then use an ultrasound to look at the inside of your uterus. If there is an abnormality, the radiologist can tell you.

TRANSVAGINAL ULTRASOUND

The ultrasound allows the doctor to view the lining of the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, and other pelvic organs. In addition, the technician can see any abnormalities, such as polyps or tumors.

ENDOMETRIAL BIOPSY

This is a procedure where the doctor takes a tissue sample from the lining of your uterus. Then, the sample is sent to a lab for testing. If there is an abnormality, the lab can tell you.

HYSTEROSCOPY

It involves a small telescope into your vagina. He can look at the inside of your uterus and ovaries. Hysteroscopy is the preferred test because it provides the best view of the uterus inside.

HOW IS BLEEDING AFTER MENOPAUSE TREATED?

There are different ways to treat bleeding after menopause. The first step is to determine if a medical condition causes the bleeding. If you have a medical condition, you can seek treatment. How to stop the bleeding depends on what’s behind it.

HYSTERECTOMY

Hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus. This procedure can be done for many reasons, but fibroids (benign tumors) or endometriosis (the most common disease that causes uterine pain).

ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES

Oral contraceptives, also known as birth control pills, prevent pregnancy. They contain hormones that reduce the production of the hormone progesterone. This causes a woman’s periods to stop.

ESTROGEN THERAPY

Women who have gone through menopause may still take estrogen to keep their bones and breasts firm.

If you are taking estrogen, it is essential to talk to your doctor about reducing the amount of estrogen you are taking. This will help you avoid side effects such as breast tenderness and thickening of the uterus lining.

PROGESTIN THERAPY

If you’re experiencing heavy menstrual bleeding, progestin therapy can help. Progestin therapy stops the production of estrogen and progesterone, two hormones that cause your period. Progestin therapy can be given as pills, patches, or vaginal rings.

CONCLUSION

Heavy menstrual bleeding can be a painful and uncomfortable experience. However, you don’t have to suffer through it. If you’re experiencing heavy menstrual bleeding, you can find out why and get treatment.

Some of these conditions can be treated, while others require a hysterectomy. The sooner you see a doctor, the better your chances of getting the proper diagnosis and treatment.

References:

acog.org/womens-health/bleeding-after

thewomens.org.au/health

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK5

ajog.org/article/0002-9378(54)9

The information in this site will not replace a medical examination or relevant medical advice. We do our best to make the most reliable and orderly information available. Still, as reliable as it may be, this information can not be a substitute for any other medical recommendation received by a qualified physician after an individual examination.
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